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Take CHARGE of Your Classroom: Grow and Engage (Part 3 of 3)

Take CHARGE of Your Classroom: Grow and Engage (Part 3 of 3)

Grow Engage Classroom management is not about power but unlocking potential. Trying to control students is like trying to keep the tide from flowing in and out. When an earthquake causes damage, we do not question why the earthquake would do such a thing. Earthquakes are a force of nature, uncontrollable and unpreventable. Damage is minimized with new construction techniques, not because architects have found a way to reduce the power of earthquakes. Instead, they’ve learned how to design buildings to move with the earth rather than rigidly fighting against it. In the same way, student misbehavior acts like a force of nature. While it cannot be conquered, careful design can reduce the impact of occurrences. Using the acronym CHARGE, the first post in this series looked at two qualities that proficient teachers embody. First, they are confident. They show resilience in the face of difficulty and when they struggle, they are sure of their ability to bounce back. Instead of saying, “That doesn’t work,” they say, “That doesn’t work – yet.” Also, teachers should emphasize their humanity, leveraging our need for relational connections to increase productivity. When students are seen, heard, and known, they are much less likely to act inappropriately. The second post of this series looked at two actions that teachers should employ to take charge of their classrooms – anticipate and reflect. Like the metaphor of building structures to resist earthquake damage, teachers can build behavior-resistant classrooms by looking for patterns and planning ahead. Visualize the daily routine and think of some alternatives if things go awry. Another form of preparation is the institution of… Read More »
Take CHARGE of Your Classroom: Anticipate and Reflect (Part 2 of 3)

Take CHARGE of Your Classroom: Anticipate and Reflect (Part 2 of 3)

Anticipate Reflect In a previous post, I shared the two qualities that teachers should embody if they want to minimize misbehavior and maximize learning. First and foremost, teachers need confidence. What they believe about themselves will play a large part in the reality they find. Those that have confidence in their ability to thrive often find that they do. On the other hand, self-defeating talk has a tendency to become true. Confidence isn’t mastery, it’s determination. Things might not be running smoothly, but teachers on the right path believe they will be soon. In addition, the second letter of the CHARGE acronym describes the most powerful component of all, their humanity. Before kids will behave and long before they even think of learning, students need to feel connected. As social beings, they crave being a part of a community. The teacher is at the nexus of this web of relationships and can facilitate closeness and camaraderie. One important aspect of this is being present. Teachers should fully come into the classroom, not holding back any part of themselves but committing themselves to their work and their students. It’s this passion and dedication that serve as the base for quality relationships that minimize misbehavior. But what can teachers specifically do to increase their classroom management proficiency? If it relied simply on being confident and human, then there would be no need for blog posts like this. While those two components describe the qualities that successful teachers should embody, there are four major actions that teachers must cultivate to avoid catastrophic behavior. Again returning to the acronym CHARGE, the first two… Read More »
Take CHARGE of Your Classroom: Confident and Human (Part 1 of 3)

Take CHARGE of Your Classroom: Confident and Human (Part 1 of 3)

Confident Human I’ve been in education for almost two decades now. I’ve been trained in many different areas, theories, and best practices. I know how to teach holistic writing, facilitate guided math, and implement a balanced literacy program. More recently, I’ve learned all about social-emotional learning, conscious discipline, and even know a thing or two about mindfulness. With all of this added on top of my content knowledge, familiarity with state standards, testing blueprints, and the basics of summative and formative assessment, you’d think I’d have been taught or trained in most areas that a teacher would need to know to be successful.  But no one ever taught me how to get kids to behave.  In my current role as an instructional coach, I should theoretically deal with content and instructional strategies. My wealth of knowledge and experience in and out of the classroom, however, haven’t yet prepared me to coach classroom management. I can go into most any classroom and get kids to respond to me in a positive way. Many exemplary educators in my department also have the ability to walk into any classroom and immediately take charge. Yet how is that done? How can I teach that to new and/or struggling teachers? Using the acronym of CHARGE, my experience and research has shown me that everything starts with confidence. (Top) Confident What we believe about ourselves often becomes reality. Teachers can greatly affect the behavior of their students by first believing in their own abilities. Many teachers are finished before they even start because of self-doubt. To paint a vivid picture, classrooms can sometimes be like a… Read More »

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This training will help to raise test scores for your students, decrease discipline challenges, and improve classroom rapport. You will learn how to meet students where they are and lead them where they need to be, capture attention, and promote deeper learning.

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